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Empowering your youth in their self or shared health care.


Tips and Links

  • Children can start early in developing skills for transition - find condition-specific timelines from the Good2Go program, and download the ON TRAC Transition Timeline.
  • Give your youth opportunities to take on responsibilities and learn new skills.
  • Check out the THRIVE app​ for parents helping their youth manage their health.​
  • Complete the Youth Quiz together every year – starting at age 12 – to identify where your youth is at.
  • Work through the Youth Toolkit Activity Cards to help youth develop skills and knowledge as they are able.
  • Hear a youth’s perspective of gaining some independence.
  • Encourage youth to be involved in their transition planning activities (to the best of their ability).

Activities For Families

ON TRAC Transition TimelineYour Future Now – A Transition Planning Guide for Youth with Special NeedsPLAN Worksheets to create understanding and build networks


Activities For Youth

Be Your own Best AdvocateGoal Setting 101
 

Tips and Links

  • Just TRAC it!: Teach youth to know all of their allergies, and record them in the Notes app on their phone or tablet.
  • Encourage youth to wear a Medic Alert bracelet.

Activities For Youth

Canadian Medic Alert MembershipAn Emergency PlanBe Your own Best Advocate
 

Tips and Links

  • Just TRAC it!Youth can use the Notes app to list medications, reason for drug, dosages, and side effects to watch for. They can use the Calendar app to list any side effects and the expiry date of prescriptions.
  • Non-emergency questions for a Pharmacist can be answered through HealthLink BC or Dial 811.
  • Look into free mobile apps to track medications and send reminders.
  • Teach youth to access their PharmaNet record (includes all medications taken in BC) through their local pharmacy.

Activities For Youth

Take a Medication QuizHow to Talk to Your PharmacistBe Your own Best Advocate
 

Tips and Links

  • Just TRAC it!: Put the number of pharmacy/name of pharmacist in the Contacts app on a phone or tablet.
  • Check pill containers for refills and ensure that youth always have one refill available.
  • Be aware of youth’s use of medications, amount taken, overuse, or sharing drugs with others.
  • Non-emergency questions for a Pharmacist can be answered through HealthLink BC or Dial 811.
  • If your youth is planning to move away from home, check the locations of local pharmacies in their new neighbourhood.
  • Know when medications require a Special Authority Request from Pharmacare and how to get this form completed and submitted.

Activities For Youth

Take a Medication QuizHow to Talk to Your Pharmacist
 

Tips and Links

  • Ask for copies or take a picture of test results.
  • Ask health care providers to explain all test results.
  • At 16 years of age, youth can set up an ehealth profile to access all their lab results online.
  • Just TRAC it!: Write down reasons for tests in the Notes app on a phone or tablet.
 

Tips and Links

  • Just TRAC it!: List  “red flags”—symptoms of getting sick or side effects—in the Calendar app on a phone or tablet. Add emergency numbers to the Contacts app—here are some suggestions.
  • Post an emergency plan on your fridge at home – who to call for what?
  • Encourage youth to wear a Medic Alert bracelet.
  • Medic Alert bracelets are provided through some school programs in BC—see participating schools.
  • Use the BC Health Services Locator app to locate emergency services throughout the province.
  • Let BC Ambulance know about special communication, behavior, or mobility needs.

Activities For Families

PLAN Worksheets to create understanding and build networks


Activities For Youth

An Emergency PlanCanadian Medic Alert MembershipKids Help Phone – You Are Not Alone!Be Your own Best Advocate
 

Tips and Links

Activities For Families

Family Support Coordinator at BC Children’sList of Benefits for Persons with DisabilitiesPersons With Disability Application FormSPARC BC Parking Permit Application Form

Activities For Youth

Getting Ready for a Health Care AppointmentTransportation and Getting AroundBe Your own Best Advocate
 

Tips and Links

  • Keep a binder of letters, reports, assessments and lab results. Include a contact list of all care providers – who to see for what, and when.
  • Pick up a free Plan-It book from the Family Resource Library at BC Children’s Hospital.
  • Scan your documents and keep a computer file and a portable USB drive, as well as a paper copy in case of an emergency. 
  • Learn about access to personal health care records before transferring to adult services.
  • Until youth are 16 years of age- parents can set up an E-Health profile to access lab results and clinic letters.
  • Just TRAC it!: Take photos of any important documents with a phone or tablet – transfer them to electronic or print records.
  • Ask for a copy of your youth’s Transition Pathway – and all applicable reports and assessments at your last pediatric clinic visit.

 
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